Fall 2009

Fall 2009

THE ROAD LESS TRAVELED
Not All Wharton MBAs spend their summer internships on Wall Street.

ANTHONY NOTO
The NFL’s Money Man

IT’S HERE
The All-New Wharton Magazine

Cover Story

  • Road_Less_Traveled

    The Road Less Traveled

    At Wharton these days, not every student aspires to a summer on the trading floor, or a Manhattan high-rise.

Featured Stories

  • The NFL’s Money Man

    A former Academic All-American linebacker and super-successful Wall Street analyst, Anthony Noto, WG’99, is now CFO for the most powerful league in sports.

Articles

  • Final Exam

    Think you could still ace your way through Wharton? Well, here’s your chance to prove it.

  • Knowledge Expands in India, Australia

    In early August, Wharton officials announced that the Australian School of Business at the University of New South Wales would be the latest affiliate location of Knowledge@Wharton.

  • Invaluable Mentoring Program Arrives in San Francisco

    Engaging students in more than 200 mentoring sessions with 20 entrepreneurs each year, Wharton Entrepreneurial Programs’ Entrepreneur-in-Residence Program is one of the School’s most popular.

  • M&T Program Celebrates 30 Years

    By Tim Hyland Under the leadership of President Amy Gutmann, the University has become home to a host of cross-disciplinary research initiatives and now offers dozens of dual-degree programs. But to hear William Hamilton say it, the Jerome Fisher Program in Management & Technology remains Penn’s best. “Our students,” says Hamilton, director of the program and Ralph Landau Professor of Management and Technology “are used to being ‘the smart kids’ in the class.” The rigorous dual-degree Fisher program has since 1979 offered students the unique opportunity to earn degrees from both Wharton and the School of Engineering and Applied Science. More than 1,400 of them have successfully done so. The program has grown dramatically over the years, but its focus, says Hamilton, has remained unchanged. Also unchanged is the quality of students the program attracts and the quality of graduates it turns out. Some of those distinguished alumni including NASA astronaut and M&T alumnus Garrett Reisman, ENG’90, W’90 will return to campus in early November to help celebrate the program’s 30th anniversary. The three-day event is set for Friday, Nov. 13 through Sunday, Nov. 15 For more information about the celebration, visit http://mt30.mandtalumni.com.

  • M&T Program Celebrates 30 Years

    By Tim Hyland Under the leadership of President Amy Gutmann, the University has become home to a host of cross-disciplinary research initiatives and now offers dozens of dual-degree programs. But to hear William Hamilton say it, the Jerome Fisher Program in Management & Technology remains Penn’s best. “Our students,” says Hamilton, director of the program and Ralph Landau Professor of Management and Technology “are used to being ‘the smart kids’ in the class.” The rigorous dual-degree Fisher program has since 1979 offered students the unique opportunity to earn degrees from both Wharton and the School of Engineering and Applied Science. More than 1,400 of them have successfully done so. The program has grown dramatically over the years, but its focus, says Hamilton, has remained unchanged. Also unchanged is the quality of students the program attracts and the quality of graduates it turns out. Some of those distinguished alumni including NASA astronaut and M&T alumnus Garrett Reisman, ENG’90, W’90 will return to campus in early November to help celebrate the program’s 30th anniversary. The three-day event is set for Friday, Nov. 13 through Sunday, Nov. 15 For more information about the celebration, visit http://mt30.mandtalumni.com.

  • Master_of_Bailout_Assistance

    Wharton Folly

      Illustration by Brian Ajhar Concept by the Wharton Folly Committee (Joel Serebransky, WG’85, Matthew Sinacori, WG’03, Ram Rajagopal, WG’02, Steve Margolis, WG’86, and Andy Stack, WG’01)

  • Wharton_Bowling_Club

    The Long-Lost Wharton Bowling Club

    By Tim Hyland Photo Courtesy of the University Archives and Records Center Wharton students today certainly aren’t in want of extracurricular activities. The Wharton Graduate Association now supports more than 100 different clubs, including 18 athletics clubs that allow students to participate in everything from basketball to rugby, squash to volleyball, ultimate Frisbee to crew. There’s even a club dedicated to “roadrunners and triathletes.” Certainly, the choices weren’t always so extensive. But those early Whartonites didn’t have it too bad. Besides, they had a bowling club (pictured)—and today’s students don’t. This stately image of the long-lost Wharton Bowling Club was taken from a 1911 edition of the Wharton Evening School Record. The photographer is unknown.

  • Citizens_Bank_Park

    Welcome to Philadelphia

    Tommy Leonardi Wharton’s newest class of MBAs enjoyed a field trip to Citizens Bank Park in late August.

  • Shropshire: “Sports will come out just fine.”

    By Tim Hyland Kenneth Shropshire, Wharton’s David W. Hauck Professor, Professor of Legal Studies and Business Ethics and director of the Wharton Sports Business Initiative, does not deny that these are challenging times for the sports world. Corporate sponsorships are hard to find and ticket sales are down. As a result, so are revenues. But even taking the bad news into account, Shropshire says the sports world can hang its hat on this: It’s in much better shape than most other sectors. “Sports will come out just fine,” Shropshire says. “The longer this recession goes, you might see different [collective bargaining] formats. You may see a team or two go bankrupt, like a hockey team in Arizona—but with a situation like that, what do you expect? The teams on the fringes may have some problems, but for the most part, these leagues are pretty strong.” During a conversation with Wharton Magazine late this summer, Shropshire shared his thoughts on how sports has fared in this difficult economy, why television networks are still pouring billions into the business and why technology, not the recession, may be the biggest threat to sports business in the years to come. So what’s the biggest challenge for sports in this economy? It’s more of [a concern about] the horizon for sponsorships, especially with companies having to report to shareholders who may ask, ‘Why are you going to make this sports investment now?’ Before, these deals may not have received a lot of scrutiny. But now shareholders really want to know, when things are so bad, what the actual return on investment for sponsoring any sports event might be. We’re seeing a lot of shuffling in that area. Companies are mostly complying with the deals that are already in place. It’s the future piece we don’t […]

  • Boediono

    From ‘Financial Rudder’ to Vice President

    By Lauren Anderson Wharton is most often associated with leaders in business. Yet many Wharton alumni are also distinguished public servants—holding such positions as prime minister, president, Chief U.S. Supreme Court Justice, ambassador, finance minister, presidential cabinet member and U.S. Senator. And now, vice president. On July 8, Indonesia, the world’s fourth most-populous country, went to the polls to elect Wharton Ph.D. alumnus Boediono as vice president, and to re-elect incumbent President Susilo Bambang Yudhoyono. After capturing more than 60 percent of the vote, Yudhoyono (often referred to as “SBY”) and Boediono, GrW’79, were set to take office on Oct. 20 with a powerful mandate. Their 73.8 million votes enabled the SBY-Boediono ticket to set a new record for the greatest number of direct votes ever cast in any democratic election. An internationally known economist and a member of Wharton’s Executive Board for Asia, Boediono has held virtually all of Indonesia’s significant economic posts, including central bank deputy governor in 1997 and State Minister of National Planning and Development in 1998. In 2005, SBY appointed him Coordinating Minister for the Economy, a job he left in 2008 to become Governor of Bank Indonesia, the country’s central bank. Boediono is perhaps best known for his talent for governing in light of fiscal distress. As Minister of Finance under former President Megawati Sukarnoputri during 2001-2004, he was widely credited with steering Indonesia’s economy back from the brink of disaster following the Asian financial crisis of 1997-98. His performance prompted his 2007 profile in Wharton Alumni Magazine’s anniversary issue, 125 Influential People and Ideas, in which he was described as “Indonesia’s financial rudder.” In the past year at Bank Indonesia, he faced another economic downturn—this one of global proportions. He carefully guided the bank through the worldwide economic turmoil. In fact, despite the […]

  • Leonard Abess, Jr.

    From the Quad: An Afternoon With Mr. Abess

    By Andrew Stern, W’10 As he prepares for his final year on campus, a senior looks back on his most memorable Wharton experience. Leonard Abess, Jr. Does the name ring a bell? Does it conjure thoughts of generosity? Well, it should. Back in November, the Spanish bank Caja Madrid paid Abess, W’70, $927 million for an 87 percent stake in his company, City National Bancshares. After completing the sale, Abess did something remarkable: He gave $60 million of his profits from the sale to 399 bank staff members and 72 former employees. Some of the checks topped $100,000. This amazing gesture earned Abess national attention. He was even praised by President Obama. I had the unique privilege of meeting Abess during his April visit to Wharton. And as I look back on my time at Wharton I know few conversations will remain so vividly etched in my mind. I fully expect that the timeless lessons Mr. Abess shared will remain with me for many years to come. “Think not of the harvest while planting.” Many Wharton alumni tell students to “follow their passion.” Mr. Abess reframed the lesson in his own unique way. Abess asked each of us to think for a moment about how fully our pursuits actually aligned with our passions. My fellow students and I began to list some of the activities we’ve participated in during our years at Penn. The enthusiasm was tangible as students spoke about the activities they had loved most. Which led me to think of my own academic passion organizational effectiveness. How can companies get the most from their people at work? How can organizations attract top talent and then retain it? These are the questions I want to help answer during my career. Wharton has given me the tools to do […]

  • Cohort_K

    From the Cohort: Wharton Bonds

    By Tyra Junaid, WG’10 From Franklin Field to the streets of Seoul, a cohort grows closer—and takes its place in the Wharton community. At the beginning of my first semester as a Wharton MBA student, a sign-up list was passed around in class for the cohort flag football team. I had never touched a football before, and so was hesitant about signing up, but our cohort sports representatives implored us to participate. They insisted we wouldn’t regret it. A few days later at Franklin Field, with a grey cohort t-shirt on and a heart full of courage, I tried my hand at the sport. Determined not to make a fool of myself, I had arrived early to get some practice under my belt. And although it was clear I wasn’t adept at such skills as, well, catching and throwing, I found myself to be quite well-suited to defense and became a regular on the team. It was a good team, too. After each game, we emailed a report of our triumphs to the rest of our cohort. Word got out that Cohort K was on a roll. Before long, we had fans. They actually came to our games, and we bonded as a team and a cohort. Our team’s performances were even discussed in class. Eventually, we went on to win the cohort championship. Our success on Franklin Field led to many other events, and our cohort friendships took hold. Second semester brought a different challenge: We were asked to renovate a dilapidated house through the Wharton Rebuilding Together program. Fixing the house would be a bigger challenge than learning the rules of football. We arrived on Day 1 to find the kitchen floor waterlogged. It was sinking, too. The stairs had no banister or railings, creating a dangerous situation […]

  • Haditha

    From Wharton to Haditha

    By Wesley R. Gray Life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness sound nice. And they are. These rights, however, would not be possible without the contributions and sacrifices of generations of men and women who served their country, and, in so doing, transformed America’s aspirations into real achievements. From my experience as a U.S. Marine, serving on the front lines of Iraq, I can tell you without reservation that the gains from giving back are certainly worth the cost and commitment required. That’s why I encourage all citizens to capitalize on their opportunity yes, opportunity to engage in public service. My experience began soon after I graduated from Wharton’s undergraduate program. I immediately enrolled in a Ph.D. program at the University of Chicago’s Booth School of Business. After two years of learning about efficient market theory, though, I decided it was time to put the leadership skills and knowledge I gained at Wharton and Booth to the test: I went on a “sabbatical” from my graduate program to serve as a U.S Marine from 2004 to 2008. In 2006, as a Marine lieutenant, I was assigned to a Military Transition Team operating in Haditha, Iraq. In my new role, I was no longer struggling to write a dissertation. I was fighting for another nation’s independence. As an embedded adviser to the Iraqi military, I stood at the core of the U.S. military strategy in Iraq. I was the proverbial “boot on the ground.” The embedded military adviser’s role is to advise, mentor and support a foreign nation’s military so that the foreign force can successfully execute military operations on its own. Missions of this nature are typically undertaken by U.S. Special Forces. But in the Iraq conflict, the demand for military advisers has outstripped our traditional capability to supply such […]

  • Empty_Building

    A Dizzying Downturn

    From Midtown to Downtown, experts agree: Manhattan’s commercial real estate market is a mess. But are better days ahead?

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