Naturally Leading Elsewhere Now: Jarrid Tingle

An undergrad built a respectable résumé across campus. Expect to hear about his impending, real-world accomplishments in finance soon.  

Tingle

Photo credit: Tommy Leonardi

Jarrid Tingle, W’13, is launching his career path with Barclays in New York following graduation, though when he was younger, he wanted to be an engineer.

“I didn’t have a direction toward finance until I went to Wharton,” he says, crediting the curriculum’s challenge for his attraction.

Eventually, he would like to end up in a private equity firm. Why? The industry’s “perfect mix of consulting, financial services and management.”

Tingle said he would also like to be involved in nonprofit organizations after he graduates. Participating in the Wharton Field Challenge during his senior year, he helped a local woman triple the client base for her cleaning business in one semester.

Part of the reason he was able to branch out and enjoy such a social impact experience on campus was because he was already set with a career. He spent last summer working at Barclays as an investment banking analyst in its global technology, media and telecom group, and earned that offer to return full time post-Wharton.

A primary reason for his varied campus life, however, is that he is a natural leader. He held leadership roles with the Black Wharton Undergraduate Association and the St. Elmo Club of Philadelphia. With Black Wharton, Tingle was director of alumni relations as a freshman and sophomore. During his junior year, as vice president of corporate development, he co-chaired the Howard E. Mitchell Memorial Conference, the group’s premier event. In his last year, he served as president. He held many of the same responsibilities as vice president and, later, president of the St. Elmo Club. Tingle was also inducted into three senior societies: Friars, Onyx, and Lantern. Perhaps most impressively, he won the 2013 Dean’s Award for Excellence.

Tingle said Wharton’s competitive academic environment has more than prepared him to move on to the business world.

“We have an advantage over our peers at other schools because of our experience dealing with high-stress situations,” Tingle says. “You learn a lot about yourself and you learn practical skills that you can take with you, and by being connected to peers that do amazing things.” 

—By Anne Freedman

Editor’s note: Read more about Wharton’s Class of 2013 and five other individual class leaders in our cover article, “Diverse, Resilient, Ready: The Class of 2013.”

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